IMF Seen Approving Yuan As “Reserve Currency”

Several days ago, Citi announced that it “expects the upcoming IMF review (scheduled for early-November) will probably lead to China’s inclusion in the SDR basket from late-2016. But we expect that the CNY will over time weaken versus the USD either way — either because of a poor outcome from SDR review or (if China joins the SDR) because of gradual (and limited) FX liberalization.”

While it remains to be seen just how negative the impact on the CNY would be as a result of any possible SDR inclusion, and the definition of China’s currency as a reserve currency, it now appears virtually assured that the IMF will include the CNY in its SDR basket, “validating efforts by President Xi Jinping to push through policies aimed at making the world’s second-biggest economy more market oriented, boosting China’s prestige as it prepares to host Group of 20 gatherings next year.”

Just a few short weeks after The IMF appeared to snub China by delaying its decision on Yuan inclusion in the SDR basket, Bloomberg reports that Otaviano Canuto, executive director at the IMF for 11 countries including Brazil, said “prospects for approval seem to be favorable,” adding that the story “is going in the direction of the renminbi becoming a necessary component of the SDR.” China is taking that as a ‘yes’ and is preparing statements celebrating IMF SDR approval.

Per Bloomberg reports

International Monetary Fund representatives have told China that yuan is likely to join the fund’s basket of reserve currencies soon, according to Chinese officials with knowledge of the matter.

IMF has given Chinese officials strong signals in meetings that yuan is likely to win inclusion in current review of Special Drawing Rights, said three people who asked not to be identified because talks were private

Chinese officials are so confident of winning approval that they have begun preparing statements to celebrate the decision, according to two people.

Board has requested that IMF staff members look into some operational challenges of including yuan in the basket, such as ability of fund’s 188 member nations to quickly convert SDRs into yuan, according to another person familiar with the matter.

“We realize that although we’ve done a lot, it’s really first up to the staff, and second up to the board, to make a final judgment,” Jin Zhongxia, China’s representative to the IMF executive board, said in interview Friday. “We have to fully respect their decision”

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Author: Travis Esquivel

Travis Esquivel is an engineer, passionate soccer player and full-time dad. He enjoys writing about innovation and technology from time to time.

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